Now Playing Tracks

1021girl:

snickerdoodlesandsausages:

enjolrasactual:

in-love-with-my-bed:

the-winchesters-creed:

ayellowstateofmind:

Imagine stabbing someone with this knife. 

It would instantly cauterize the would, so the person wouldn’t bleed, so it’s not very useful.

if you want information it is

and above, in order, we see a gryffindor, a ravenclaw, and a slytherin

why would you stab a PERSON when you can have TOAST?

There’s the hufflepuff

(Source: picapixels)

Why Are Pears Wrapped In Tissue Paper?

Ever notice how pears at the supermarket or corner store are often partially wrapped in tissue paper? You might think that’s to protect the pears, and you’d be right. But the protection is more complicated than it seems at first glance, and that paper wrapping is more than just paper—it’s often impregnated with chemicals.

First, some quick background: Pears have very delicate skins that are extremely susceptible to bruising and abrasion. They also have fairly long, stiff stems, which can cause problems when a bunch of pears are put together in a packing box, where the stem from one pear can puncture the skin of another. Pears are also vulnerable to an oxidation-driven condition called superficial scald, which is that brown, rust-like staining that you’ve probably seen. In addition, pears can be stricken by fungal pathogens and mold, which can spread from one pear to another during shipping and storage.

Or to put it another way, pears can be kind of a high-maintenance pain in the ass. “That’s true,” says Mike Willett, vice president for scientific affairs at the Northwest Horticultural Council, an industry trade group. “But you know, it’s the queen of fruits. You’re willing to do a lot for the queen.”

Willet says the individual wrapping of pears, which goes back at least a century, is intended to address all these problems. "Back in the early 1900s, pear packers started using wrapping paper treated with food-grade oil, which slowed down the rate of oxidation and reduced the superficial scald," he explains. "Later on, they discovered this antioxidant called ethoxyquin, which does a much better job.” In addition to ethoxyquin, most pear wrapping these days contains copper, which helps stop the spread of gray mold. Some grocers remove the wrapping before displaying the pears for retail sale, but many leave it on.

So about those elements in the wrapping paper—are they commonly found in other parts of the produce world? "Copper is used quite a bit in pest control for a wide variety of crops," Willett says. "Ethoxyquin is only used on certain cultivars of pears." And are they safe? "All these materials are regulated by the EPA," Willett says. "They go through the same screening and review as anything else used in the growing process." Fair enough, but it’s worth noting that ethoxyquin is somewhat controversial and is not approved for use in the European Union or Australia. If you’re concerned about these additives, there’s a simple way to avoid them: Buy organic pears, whose paper wrappers don’t include ethoxyquin or copper.

Meanwhile, the machine that wraps all the pears must be pretty cool to see, right? Wrong—it’s all done by hand. “It’s an amazing thing to watch,” says Cristie Mather, communications director for Pear Bureau Northwest, another trade group. “It’s usually done by women, because they have smaller hands, which gives them the dexterity that’s needed for the job.” Yeah, or maybe it’s one of those low-wage, dead-end jobs that have traditionally been filled by women. In any case, nobody contacted for this story could say how much this extra labor added to the price of a pear, but it’s definitely an added step that doesn’t apply to most other produce—something to think about the next time you reach for the queen of fruits. [x]

Low-Inflammatory/Ketogenic Diet FAQ. What changes work for you guys?

chroniccurve:

I’ve been getting a lot of inbox questions asking what my diet is like and if it could work for some of you, so I’ve decided to answer all of them here in a post.

I preface this by saying this is simply what works for me and my body. Please, please, please do your research, talk to your doctors, have baseline labs done, etc, before you decided to make any drastic dietary changes.

What is a Ketogenic diet?

  • A ketogenic diet is a medical diet used for patients with different neurological disorders, mainly epilepsy
  • It is a low carbohydrate, high (healthy) fat diet, moderate protein diet
  • In my case, it is used differently than it would be used in epilepsy patients.
  • It’s similar to the Atkins diet and in my case, is full of low-inflammatory, fresh foods

Why did you go on the diet?

  • I was looking to eliminate foods to see if gluten/wheat, sugar, etc was making my inflammation worse, to lose weight, and improve my overall health
  • It was a lifestyle change that I felt I needed

What do you eat?

  • Veggies—spinach and romain lettuce, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower.
  • Meat—lots of chicken breast and grassfed red meats

  • Nuts (except peanuts—legumes are high inflammatory), cheeses, EVOO-based dressings, natural/organic peanut butter in tiny amounts (aka not Skippy that’s filled with sugar), very dark chocolate, eggs/egg whites, Quest protein bars, avocado, chicken broth/soups, coconut oil, etc.

  • Things I don’t eat: wheat, refined sugars, most fruit (except for berries), starchy veggies, beer, juice/soft drinks, milk (I try to limit dairy intake as much as possible), nitrate-heavy or processed foods.

  • I plan all of my recipes, do food prep on weekends, and make my meals extremely ‘spoonie-friendly’—low fuss, little mess, easy to make recipes are a must.

Did it help your arthritis?

  • Somewhat. It’s made a huge difference in some of the arthritis-related skin issues I was having, but it’s not been enough to get me to remission, that’s for sure. It is not a cure.
  • That said, I’m sticking with it anyway. When I ‘cheat’ and have pasta or bread, I feel like complete crap now and definitely feel it in my joints—a sign that I can’t and won’t go back to a high or even moderate carbohydrate diet.
  • It has eliminated 2/3 of my migraines and improved my endometriosis-related symptoms. And I’ve lost 40lbs in the past few months, so that’s a plus too.

Should I try a diet?

  • If you want to make drastic nutritional changes, please consult your doctor first and foremost. What works for me may not work for you. A high fat, low carb diet is not for everyone—it’s a lifestyle change.
  • If you’re hoping to make a pretty big lifestyle change, take on the task gradually. Gradually modifying your habits can make it easier to adjust to a new way of eating. E.g., slowly decreasing the amount of refined sugar/crap in your diet is probably going to be easier than cutting it all out and then craving some Cheetos big time! Or not! Do what you think will work for you.

What does a day of meals look like for you?

Here’s what my meals today were:

  • 2-5L of water
  • Breakfast: a Quest protein bar and a cup of chicken broth with two tbs of cream
  • Lunch: shredded rotisserie chicken breast with caesar dressing and lettuce
  • Dinner: grass fed London Broil and sautéed brussel sprouts or broccoli with garlic and bacon
  • Snacks: two pieces of cheddar cheese, 
  • Dessert: a tiny bit of sugar free whipped cream and a few tiny pieces of 85% dark chocolate

Where can I learn more about a low carbohydrate or low-inflammatory diet?


So that’s that. It’s very strict and I definitely miss reeses peanut butter cups, but it’s worth it. Let me know in the comment section or my inbox if you want me to post any of my easy, chronic pain/illness-friendly recipes, I’d be happy to do so.

I want to hear from you guys: what dietary changes have helped you? Have you found a diet that helps your inflammatory or chronic condition?

Low-Inflammatory/Ketogenic Diet FAQ. What changes work for you guys?

chroniccurve:

I’ve been getting a lot of inbox questions asking what my diet is like and if it could work for some of you, so I’ve decided to answer all of them here in a post.

I preface this by saying this is simply what works for me and my body. Please, please, please do your research, talk to your doctors, have baseline labs done, etc, before you decided to make any drastic dietary changes.

What is a Ketogenic diet?

  • A ketogenic diet is a medical diet used for patients with different neurological disorders, mainly epilepsy
  • It is a low carbohydrate, high (healthy) fat diet, moderate protein diet
  • In my case, it is used differently than it would be used in epilepsy patients.
  • It’s similar to the Atkins diet and in my case, is full of low-inflammatory, fresh foods

Why did you go on the diet?

  • I was looking to eliminate foods to see if gluten/wheat, sugar, etc was making my inflammation worse, to lose weight, and improve my overall health
  • It was a lifestyle change that I felt I needed

What do you eat?

  • Veggies—spinach and romain lettuce, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower.
  • Meat—lots of chicken breast and grassfed red meats

  • Nuts (except peanuts—legumes are high inflammatory), cheeses, EVOO-based dressings, natural/organic peanut butter in tiny amounts (aka not Skippy that’s filled with sugar), very dark chocolate, eggs/egg whites, Quest protein bars, avocado, chicken broth/soups, coconut oil, etc.

  • Things I don’t eat: wheat, refined sugars, most fruit (except for berries), starchy veggies, beer, juice/soft drinks, milk (I try to limit dairy intake as much as possible), nitrate-heavy or processed foods.

  • I plan all of my recipes, do food prep on weekends, and make my meals extremely ‘spoonie-friendly’—low fuss, little mess, easy to make recipes are a must.

Did it help your arthritis?

  • Somewhat. It’s made a huge difference in some of the arthritis-related skin issues I was having, but it’s not been enough to get me to remission, that’s for sure. It is not a cure.
  • That said, I’m sticking with it anyway. When I ‘cheat’ and have pasta or bread, I feel like complete crap now and definitely feel it in my joints—a sign that I can’t and won’t go back to a high or even moderate carbohydrate diet.
  • It has eliminated 2/3 of my migraines and improved my endometriosis-related symptoms. And I’ve lost 40lbs in the past few months, so that’s a plus too.

Should I try a diet?

  • If you want to make drastic nutritional changes, please consult your doctor first and foremost. What works for me may not work for you. A high fat, low carb diet is not for everyone—it’s a lifestyle change.
  • If you’re hoping to make a pretty big lifestyle change, take on the task gradually. Gradually modifying your habits can make it easier to adjust to a new way of eating. E.g., slowly decreasing the amount of refined sugar/crap in your diet is probably going to be easier than cutting it all out and then craving some Cheetos big time! Or not! Do what you think will work for you.

What does a day of meals look like for you?

Here’s what my meals today were:

  • 2-5L of water
  • Breakfast: a Quest protein bar and a cup of chicken broth with two tbs of cream
  • Lunch: shredded rotisserie chicken breast with caesar dressing and lettuce
  • Dinner: grass fed London Broil and sautéed brussel sprouts or broccoli with garlic and bacon
  • Snacks: two pieces of cheddar cheese, 
  • Dessert: a tiny bit of sugar free whipped cream and a few tiny pieces of 85% dark chocolate

Where can I learn more about a low carbohydrate or low-inflammatory diet?


So that’s that. It’s very strict and I definitely miss reeses peanut butter cups, but it’s worth it. Let me know in the comment section or my inbox if you want me to post any of my easy, chronic pain/illness-friendly recipes, I’d be happy to do so.

I want to hear from you guys: what dietary changes have helped you? Have you found a diet that helps your inflammatory or chronic condition?

To Tumblr, Love Pixel Union